2016 Carrara Residency Party Retrospective

For the past 6 years, ABC Stone, in cooperation with New York Academy of Art, has sponsored a stone sculpting Artist Residency in Carrara, Italy, as part of its ongoing commitment to promoting the use of stone in artistic practice. Based at Corsanini Studios, located at the foothills of Apuan Alps, the Carrara Residency exposes students to the global art world, helps them cultivate lifelong relationships, and hone their craft in an immersive environment.

To honor the sculptures produced by the recipients of the 2016 Artist Residency in Carrara, New York Academy of Art students, Jiannan Wu and Brice Esso, ABC Stone held a celebration in its colorful Brooklyn warehouse.

As aerial acrobats entertained guests with their graceful maneuvers overhead, below were enjoyed dozens of new sculptures, from the hyperrealist sculptor Robin Antar, Stephen Shaheen, Barbara Segal, Alasdair Thomson, Michael Kukla, and Barry X Ball among others.

Brice Esso is a perfect example of a contemporary Renaissance Man. Born in Cote d’Ivoire in 1991, his childhood was filled with experiences that helped shape his sensibility for art and culture. Although his family had different expectations for him, he decided to travel abroad to pursue his college degree in America. While completing a Bachelor’s degree in business, Brice reconnected with his passion for visual arts. It is at New York Academy of Art that Brice continues to develop his skills as a sculptor.

Jiannan Wu is celebrated as a young artist specializing in sculpture and drawing. Born in 1990 in Dalian, China, Jiannan started to learn painting and drawing at the age of seven. From 2009 to 2014 he studied sculpture at the China Academy of Art, Hangzhou, and graduated with a BFA. He works in both sculpture and drawing, and is interested in the relationship between image and sculpture. In his creative approach, he uses the combination of two-dimensional images and three-dimensional sculptures—the perspective effect of pictures is utilized in his sculptures.

ABC is honored to have had the opportunity to further the education of these promising young artists. It is our belief that deepening the awareness of stone commensurately widens respect for this venerable medium and millennia-old tradition of transforming it through highly skilled craft.

Entertainment provided: Adair Moran Aerialists

Lighting: Ken Farmer & Kyle Garner of Wild Dogs International

Music provided: DJ Leecy T

Photography: Elliot Goldstein

Culinary delights: Halcyon Gourmet

Photobooth fun: Mashbooths

Have any pictures of the event? Upload and tag @ABCStone or #LiveYourLifeInStone.

How to Pronounce the Names of 22 Notable Architects (from Arch Daily)

There’s no doubt that one of the best things about architecture is its universality. Wherever you come from, whatever you do, however you speak, architecture has somehow touched your life. However, when one unexpectedly has to pronounce a foreign architect’s name… things can get a little tricky. This is especially the case when mispronunciation could end up making you look less knowledgeable than you really are. (If you’re really unlucky, it could end up making you look stupid in front of your children and the whole world.)

To help you out, we’ve compiled a list of 22 architects with names that are a little difficult to pronounce, and paired them with a recording in which their names are said impeccably. Listen and repeat as many times as it takes to get it right, and you’ll be prepared for any intellectual architectural conversation that comes your way. View this article at ARCH DAILY.

2017 Tribeca Ball Retrospective

At the annual Tribeca Ball, guests explore all six floors of the historic Franklin Street building that houses New York Academy of Art, while visiting with over one-hundred MFA artists in their studios over cocktails and hors d’oeuvres, with dinner guests moving on to a meal prepared by a master chef.

This year’s Ball, subtitled A Magical Menagerie, honored Will Cotton. Will trained at NYAA in the 1980s and is an unwavering protagonist of the academy’s mission. He teaches Master Classes, serves as a Senior Critic, and hosts an Artists’ Drawing Party fundraiser every fall. He is represented by Mary Boone, and known for his surreal, colorful portraits. Will has exhibited in major group and solo shows the world over, including at the National Portrait Gallery, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and the Triennale di Milano.

The event’s décor plunged guests into the aforementioned “menagerie,” with six floors of fantastical animal-themed installations inspired by Van Cleef and Arpels’ latest jewelry collection, L’Arche de Noé.

Starting in the lobby guests were regaled by the sounds of the Spiros Exaras Trio, and moving on to the upper floors they explored artists’ studios, an installation of prints by current NYAA students, and live drawing by alumni, among many other fanciful attractions.

Event Chairs included Alain Bernard, Christina Di Donna, Brooke Shields and Naomi Watts.

Support of the ball directly impacts the Academy’s scholarships and educational programming, allowing it to fulfill its mission of training the most talented emerging artists in the skills and techniques essential to the creation of vital contemporary art.

For more coverage of the Ball: Vogue, Avenue Magazine, Women’s Wear Daily.

ARDEX Tile & Stone Installation Systems is now offering a 25-Year SystemOne™ tier Warranty on select high performance products


NEW 25 YEAR WARRANTY!
We are pleased to announce that ARDEX Tile & Stone Installation Systems
is now offering a 25-Year SystemOne™ tier Warranty
on select high performance products (see below).

Program Summary
25 Year SystemOne™ Single Source Comprehensive Warranty
for interior and non-submerged applications

As with the current SystemOne™ Warranty Program, the 25-year tier can be achieved
by combining a minimum of two ARDEX Tile & Stone Installation Systems products in a system

Improved warranties on most lower-tier products

Projects exceeding 5,000 sq. ft. must be approved
by the ARDEX Technical Department.
Please contact your ARDEX Sales Professional for all warranty requirements

ARDEX SystemOne™ Warranty, the most comprehensive single source coverage within
the tile and stone industry…now even better!

Click here to view the complete warranty.

Stone Discoveries: Luget Limestone

Barneys New York, 660 Madison Avenue

Luget is a beige limestone, distinct for its homogeneity and the smooth consistency of its graining. It is quarried exclusively in the commune of Pranzac, in the Charente department in southwestern France. Upon reaching the town for my visit to the quarry, I was immediately struck by the appearance before me of the Castle of Pranzac: a large, crumbling ruin from the early feudal period. I had been struck by both the beauty of this lingering vestige of a time long lost, and the irony that, so close to what was in its heyday the height of decorative arts, is a quarry from which we cull raw materials for treasured ruins of the future.

The Luget quarry covers over 130,000 square feet, and the company which operates it produces approximately 30,000 cubic feet of limestone each year, primarily supplying large scale projects—for which reason is this stone ideal for such projects. In the recent past, the quarry has provided material for Barneys New York at 660 Madison Avenue, various museum pedestals in the Galerie Richelieu of the Musée du Louvre, and several of the chateaux and wineries of Bordeaux.

The most common finishing technique employed with this material is honing, a process of sharpening with hand scrapers and plane blades to achieve a smooth, flat consistency. Giving the stone this kind of clarity of texture tends to highlight its striking uniformity, and the muted and consistent nature of its graining. It is a disarmingly warm, earthy stone, with gold, at other times, ochre, hues; and, superlative as a building material for residential interiors when textured with an antic or brushed surface.

Perhaps the key to the splendor of Luget limestone is its versatility: at home in modern interiors as well as treads and copings, employed as veneer or with dynamic dimensionality. Luget can even be used as a cobblestone, hence giving the material extensive purchase as a resource for landscape architects and urban designers.

Luget quarry

Most frequently applied as residential flooring, paving and wall-cladding, Luget stone’s versatility is evident in that it can also be carved, allowing for a variety of elaborate and beautiful frontages for the structures it adorns,—such as the relatively recently constructed, extremely modern Yorkville condominium development at 170 East End Avenue.

The natural stone currently on view at ABC represents only the finest rocks on earth. Procured from 6 continents, ABC has truly moved mountains across oceans to bring the finest stone on earth to the A&D community. We are honored to bring to you Luget limestone, from the south of France.












ARDEX S 28™ MICROTEC(R): Launching February 13th, 2017


INTRODUCING ARDEX S 28™ MICROTEC®
Rapid-Set, Rapid-Dry, Super-Format Tile
and Uncoupling Membrane Mortar

“The Most Advanced Mortar Technology
for Large  and Super Format Tile”

We are excited to announce the launch of ARDEX S 28™ MICROTEC® – SAP# 25471.
ARDEX S 28 is a very unique, high-performance, rapid drying and rapid hardening,
microfiber-reinforced, polymer-modified tile and stone mortar,
with ARDEX Self Drying Technology. 

Unmatched performance and protection for super-format tile
and uncoupling membrane installations!


Key Features
ARDEX Self Drying Technology – (Rapid Drying, Rapid Hardening and NO Shrinkage!)
Walk on and grout in just 4 hours
Extended open time of 45 minutes
Perfect for large and super-format tile and stone installations
Semi-pourable consistency; easily enables full tile coverage
Thin to medium bed installation up to 5/8″ (15 mm)
75-minute pot life
For use on interior floors and walls

Available Sizes 
40 lb. (18 kg)  Gray
SAP# 25471 

Click here, to visit the ARDEX S 28 product page on the website.
Click here, to view the ARDEX S 28 product sheet
Click here, to view the ARDEX S 28 tech data

Penn Palimpsest: History Becomes the Future (Architectural League Lecture)

In 2016, The New York Times asked Vishaan Chakrabarti and his firm Practice for Architecture and Urbanism (PAU) to develop a proposal for the redevelopment of Penn Station that would address issues not resolved by current initiatives to redevelop the Farley Post Office. Most notably, the Farley plans do not solve the problem that a very large proportion of daily users of the station cannot use a redeveloped Farley building because of the position of Long Island Railroad and New Jersey Transit platforms, which are largely located between Seventh and Eighth avenues and cannot be moved.

PAU developed a proposal that would repurpose the current Madison Square Garden as a new terminal serving LIRR and New Jersey transit riders to complement the Amtrak station proposed by Governor Cuomo for the Farley building. Michael Kimmelman, the Times architecture critic, called the idea of creating a new grand entryway to New York from the existing Madison Square Garden structure a possible solution “hiding in plain sight” to the issues that have long bedeviled efforts to redevelop the station. The PAU proposal, presented in an interactive feature in the Times on September 30, has been further developed with support from the Ford Foundation.

On February 23, Vishaan Chakrabarti will present the proposal in a program co-sponsored by The Architectural League and the Regional Plan Association. RPA president Tom Wright will provide a brief history and policy context of issues surrounding Penn Station redevelopment, and the presentation of the proposal will be followed by a discussion with Wright, architectural and urban historian Hilary Ballon, and architect Henry N. Cobb. Learn more about this event at ARCH LEAGUE.